Book Review: Editor Maxine Beneba Clarke celebrates voices from the African diaspora in Growing Up African in Australian

Edited by Maxine Beneba Clarke, with Magan Magan and Ahmed YussufGrowing Up African in Australia is a new anthology from Black Inc., following on from Alice Pung’s Growing Up Asian in AustraliaBenjamin Law’s Growing Up Queer in Australia and Anita Heiss’ Growing Up Aboriginal in Australia. Carly Findlay, who also contributed to this collection, will edit Growing Up Disabled in Australia, with a due date to be announced.

Following the format of past works, submissions were accepted from people across the African diaspora, and the end result is an anthology filled with extraordinary prose, heartfelt poetry, and fascinating interviews, all exploring the lived experiences of African-Australians.

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Book Review: Jane Rawson’s From the Wreck is a haunting blend of fact and fantasy

In 1859, the steamship Admella sinks off the coast of South Australia. One of the few survivors is George Hills, who never quite manages to shake the events of the wreck. But George is haunted by more than just the cost of his survival, as a creature from another dimension who survived in the guise of a woman on board, attaches herself to his family, desperately seeking refuge and the last remnants of her own kind.

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Book Review: Regency London meets rich fantasy in Zen Cho’s The True Queen

Washed ashore on the island of Janda Baik, sisters Muni and Satki have no memory of their former lives. Mak Genggang, the region’s foremost witch, knows a curse when she sees it and in the mortal Muna and the magical Satki, it’s clear as day to her what has happened. Unable, or unwilling, to answer the young women’s questions about their past, she sends them to Britain, where they will live under the protection of the controversial Sorceress Royal, in her academy for female thaumaturges. But the fastest path to the school goes directly through Fairyland, a dangerous place ruled by the powerful Queen of the Djinns and, by the time Muni emerges in London, Satki is nowhere to be found…

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